It is quite easy to add Groovy support. Once the support is in place you can use Groovy as you would use regular Java.  As a matter of fact to test out Groovy we will create a Struts2 action with it!

Following assumes we have set up a basic struts2 application using Maven:

1) In Netbeans, expand the "Project Files" and open pom.xml.

2a) Locate the maven compiler plugin, which in my poms typically looks like the following:

            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3.2</version>
                <configuration>
                    <source>1.7</source>
                    <target>1.7</target>
                    <compilerArguments>
                        <endorseddirs>${endorsed.dir}</endorseddirs>
                    </compilerArguments>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>

2b) Edit this pom.xml such that the above looks like the following:

            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3.2</version>
                <configuration>
                    <compilerId>groovy-eclipse-compiler</compilerId>
                    <verbose>true</verbose>
                    <source>1.7</source>
                    <target>1.7</target>
                </configuration>
                <dependencies>
                    <dependency>
                        <groupId>org.codehaus.groovy</groupId>
                        <artifactId>groovy-eclipse-compiler</artifactId>
                        <version>2.6.0-01</version>
                    </dependency>
                </dependencies>
            </plugin>

3) Add the following dependancy

        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.codehaus.groovy</groupId>
            <artifactId>groovy-all</artifactId>
            <version>1.8.4</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>

4) Download a copy of groovy-all-1.8.4.jar and copy it into the glassfish lib folder (partial path on my system is .../glassfish-3.1.2/glassfish/lib/groovy-all-1.8.4.jar).


With that bit of initial configuration out of the way we can now use Groovy quite seemlessly in our project.

Create a Struts2 action (will use the struts2 conventions plugin to avoid needless configuration)

In Netbeans 7.1, create a new package under source packages called com.kenmcwilliams.action.groovy.

Right click that folder and create a new groovy file (New->Other->Category:Groovy->Groovy Class).  If the following options does not exist you will need at add Groovy (Tools(menu)->Plugins->Availible Plugins(tab)->select "Groovy and Grails").

package com.kenmcwilliams.action.groovy
import com.opensymphony.xwork2.ActionSupport;
import com.opensymphony.xwork2.Action;

   class Gest extends ActionSupport{
       String greeting = "Hello from Groovy!";
       public String execute(){
           println "Grooooovy!"
           return "success";
       }
  }

Create a view to render the action:

<%@taglib prefix="s" uri="/struts-tags"%>
<%@page contentType="text/html" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
        <title>Message from Groovy</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <h1>Message from Groovy</h1>
        <s:property value="greeting"/>
    </body>
</html>

That's all there is to it!

Tags:
Created by Ken McWilliams on 2012/04/17 06:07
     
This wiki is licensed under a Creative Commons 2.0 license
XWiki Enterprise 11.4 - Documentation